Suzuki violin lessons are an early investment in the lives of our children.  This investment has tremendous rewards in the long term.  Suzuki violin students learn community, self-worth, discipline, focus, cooperation, music theory, musicality, and how to enjoy life through playing the violin.

These benefits are directly linked to the time, energy, and money you and your student invest.  To give you an idea of what this might look like for a beginning student, as far as TIME and MONEY go, I have compiled the following two tables.  Let me be clear that these are not definitive lists but rather general outlines of what this musical adventure will require of you and your student the first few years.

TIME

When

Who

What

30 minutes

Weekly

Parent and Student

Lesson attendance (parents are an active part of each lesson, taking notes and asking questions so they are prepared to be the practice partner* during the week)

15-30 minutes

Daily

Parent and Student

Practice at home (parents actively motivate and guide their student)

15-30 minutes

Daily

Parent and Student

Listening to the recording of the pieces he/she is working on (this can be done while doing other things)

1 hour

Bi-weekly

Parent and Student

Group lesson attendance (parents observe)

TBD

Yearly

Parent and Student

Recitals and other performance opportunities (parents observe and help when needed)

MONEY

When

What

$125

Monthly

Studio tuition for a 30 min. weekly lesson: covers private lessons, group lessons, make-up lessons, administrative expenses, consultations, select supplies, select recitals and performances, and access to select Suzuki materials

Approx. $25

Monthly

Violin rental

TBD

Annually

Other music supplies (music books, recordings, music stand, metronome, strings, rosin, shoulder rest, various items at various prices)

$30

 Annually

Studio registration fee

TBD  Annually  Local Suzuki workshop fee

*Choosing the “practice partner”:  I ask that with each student there is one designated parent/adult that attends the lessons and works as a practice partner with their child during the week.  For this role it is best to choose a parent/adult that does not travel a lot for work and has time during the week to invest in daily practice.  I understand when there are rare cases when the practice partner must find a substitute, but expect that the designated practice partner be involved with the lessons/practicing/listening at least 90% of the time.  This connection with one adult not only supports consistency and progress in music education but is a valuable bonding experience which Dr. Suzuki of the Suzuki approach holds just as highly as the technical success of the child.

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